obama’s memoir

As I sit and watch the first Euro quarter-final game, I just finished reading Barack Obama’s memoir Dreams From My Father. I have been in a bit of a memoir phase lately, and I thought it would be interesting to dive into the story of the man who could possible be the next president of the United States.

While I did enjoy the book, I found that it was maybe 100 pages too long. The first section details his childhood in Hawaii and Indonesia, his coming to terms with not knowing his father [who was from Kenya] and being raised by his white mother and grandparents. Part two details his time in Chicago as a community organizer, and part three is an account of his first trip to Kenya and a full unveiling of his family history. It would be from the second part that I would remove those hundred pages; although this sections offers insight into what is important to him and discusses some issues that might shed some light on what kind of president he could be, this section didn’t really fit into the scope of family history which constitutes the main thread of the memoir.

The one thing that struck me about this book and about Barack Obama is that he seems to understand that through all the potential differences that exist between the people of our world [whether that be religion, race, ideology etc], we all share a common humanity. I would go further and define that as the image of God within us. No matter what separates us, we are all linked by the fact that we have been created by and are loved by God. I don’t know if Obama would put it like that, but I do think he possesses a faith in people and a sense of our commonality that, in my mind, is an important trait for a man looking to step into the role of US President.

Overall, it was a good read and I would recommend it to those wanting to look a bit deeper into Obama’s history.

Next up: A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini, author of The Kite Runner

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